5 Stars for BROKEN DOLLS by Tyrolin Puxty – BOOK REVIEW

  
Title: BROKEN DOLLS

Series: Broken Dolls – Book One

Author: Tyrolin Puxty

Length: 175 pages

Genre: Fantasy, Horror, Science Fiction 

Publication Date: December 14, 2015

Publisher: Curiosity Quills Press

EBook ISBN: 978-1-62007-929-4 

Hardcover ISBN: 978-1-62007-931-7

Paperback ISBN: 978-1-62007-930-0 

Rating: 5 out of 5 stars ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️🌟 

First off I feel that I have to mention the stunningly gorgeous cover of this book. The “doll” is stylized and disjointed with a black wind-up type key in its right side. The choice of having the doll standing on a plush red heart that matches the colour of the doll’s dress mixed with the small black butterflies surrounding her gives a sense of something just not quite right about her surroundings. When you look closer, you realize that she is standing on a hinged piece of wood which is attached to a similar piece of wood located behind her. In fact, it looks like the two pieces fit tightly together with the doll flattened inside whenever it is closed. Also, I love that the book title, along with the author’s name are inside scroll work. The chosen font is perfect.

In fact, I had decided that I wanted to read this book solely based on the cover design. Once I read the description I was thrilled that the book sounded just as interesting as the book’s cover. 

“Slowly and silently, cries the dancing doll, meekly, angelically, she weeps for her soul.”

Ella used to be human, but she has no memories of that time. She is a doll … A broken doll. She has lived the past thirty years as a doll. She was “saved” from her human life and turned into a doll by the Professor. 

Ella lives in the attic and has been conditioned by the Professor to never try to leave it. 

When the Professor decides to make another doll Ella is excited. She has never had another doll to play with. She knows that when the new doll wakes up she will be devoid of memories, won’t even know her own name and will be disoriented, but Ella vows to help her adapt to her new life.

The new doll’s name is Lisa. When the Professor activates her, Ella asks her what she remembers and is shocked to find that not only does Lisa remember her own name, but that the majority of her memories are also intact. Another shock comes when Ella realizes that Lisa is mad. 

When the Professor’s granddaughter, Gabby arrives, the Professor tells Ella that they will become friends. 

But, what will happen to Lisa? Will Gabby somehow accept a talking doll? Is the Professor out of his mind? Is he evil? Or is he actually a saviour? How does he turn humans into dolls? And, why would he want to? 

For answers to the questions above as well as many more, you will need to read BROKEN DOLLS. 

You will not regret your decision to pick up this book. The only thing you might not like is that the story has to end eventually, but I am happy to report that this is the first book in a planned series. I will be eagerly awaiting the release of Tyrolin Puxty’s next book. 

The characters in this book are complex and believable and the concept of being changed from a living, breathing human into a doll is absolutely horrifying. Imagine never again feeling a fresh breeze on your face, never feeling the softness of grass under your feet and never being able to smell the distinctive aroma of fresh cut grass. These may seem minor things, but they are all significant parts of being human. 

Tyrolin Puxty has a wondrous gift for vivid descriptions that evoke emotional responses in the reader. For example, when describing a first visit to the ballet, she says: “The orchestra was like a romantic radioactive wave that wafted through the theatre, sending ripples of emotion through the audience. The dancers’ technique was flawless, impeccable, perfect. I loved how their eyes glistened when the audience cheered. I envied their heaving chests as they posed during the applause. I wanted the exquisitely crafted costumes that pressed into their flesh. THEY have a life.”

Not only is this book a great read but it also brings up many ethical questions such as: 

The dilemma of quantity vs quality of life

Is it better to die? Or live trapped in a dolls body?

Is he evil? Or is he a saint and a saviour?

Was does “to live” really mean? Is it life if you don’t breathe? Is it life if you are stripped of your memories?

At what point do we cease to be human? What if you were in a car accident and you lost both legs and both arms and they were replaced with prosthetics? Would this make you less human? 

For all the reasons outlined above and for the sheer entertainment value, I rate this book as 5 out of 5 stars.⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ 

To find out more about this phenomenal read go to: https://curiosityquills.com/books/broken-dolls/  

QUOTES FROM THE BOOK:

“If she’s going to be a black hole of misery that absorbs my happiness, then she belongs in the shadows!” 

“The storm intensifies. Sticks and other small pieces keep flinging against the window. It’s really creeping me out. I keep imagining a demonic deer hovering outside, saliva dripping from its snarl as it headbutts the pane. Why a demonic deer? No clue. Deer are terrifying. I’ve never even been able to finish ‘Bambi’.” 

ABOUT THE AUTHOR:

  
Tyrolin Puxty is only 23 years old but she has already accomplished quite a bit in a short time. She was awarded “Australian of the Year” in both 2014 and 2015. She has also worked as a paralegal, appeared in television shows, been hired for product photography, modelled, become a Justice of the Peace, started her own club for school-age children who are interested in the arts, worked for a successful magazine company, published a book, hugged a koala and had a show ride collapse on her head. 

To learn more about this author visit http://www.tyrolinpuxty.com 

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One thought on “5 Stars for BROKEN DOLLS by Tyrolin Puxty – BOOK REVIEW

  1. Considering the reference to the ballet, one would wonder if the inspiration for the tale comes from E. T. A. Hoffmann’s story The Nutcracker and the Mouse King, which was the inspiration for the famous ballet. The girl who becomes a doll – the nature of death, sanity and reality are part of Hoffman’s ambiguous tale.

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